Amey wins £129M water network maintenance contract

Amey will carry out maintenance works under the contract
Amey will carry out maintenance works under the contract

Amey has been awarded a £129M contract to deliver metering installations and planned and reactive maintenance for Affinity Water in parts of south east England.

 

This Network Infrastructure Maintenance Agreement is a five year contract and follows ten years of work previously carried out by Amey for the water supplier.

 

Amey chief executive Mel Ewell said: “Our teams have a proven track record of employing a range of innovative technologies to minimise disruption for customers and the local community, in line with Affinity Water’s vision.

 

“I’m delighted that we are further cementing our relationship through this new contract, supporting Affinity Water in providing a value for money service, and ensuing a reliable supply of high quality drinking water.”

 

Amey has experience providing clean water services for Affinity Water such as mains renewal, installation of new mains, new supply connections to the network and mains cleaning. The firm is also the sole contractor in providing connections to new residential and commercial developments in the water supplier’s network.

 

Affinity Water Director of community operations Andrew McAlinden said: “I am delighted to be able to announce that Amey has been successful in being awarded the contract for our Network Infrastructure Maintenance Agreement. We have absolute confidence in their ability to help deliver our Business Plan objectives and ensure our customers continue to receive a high quality water service.”

 

Affinity Water provides water to more than 3.5 million people. Its main region covers parts of Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Surrey and the London Boroughs of Harrow, Hillingdon, Barnet, Brent, Ealing and Enfield. It also supplies the Tendring peninsula in Essex and the Folkestone and Dover areas of Kent.

 

The company was previously called Three Valleys Water before changing its name to Veolia Water Central in 2009. Then in 2012 it became ‘Affinity Water following a takeover by a consortium led by M&G (Prudential) and Morgan Stanley Infrastructure.

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