Skanska bags £50m Cambridge Uni infrastructure project

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Skanska bags £50m Cambridge Uni infrastructure project

 

The £50m infrastructure deal incorporates the installation of sustainable urban drainage system throughout the site, which will be the largest rainwater recycling system in the country upon its completion.

 

Within the scope of the project all logistics and management arrangements must be provided to enable site works, including: traffic management, security, delivery management, site access and egress and management of the roadways throughout the building works.

 

Since Skanska was chosen as the project’s main contractor, it will handle the logistics to enable site works, including traffic management, security, site access and management of the roadways throughout the building works.

 

In general, the University’s masterplan includes 3,000 homes, 2,000 post-graduate student spaces and 100,000 m2 of research space.

 

It is estimated that the first phase of work will cost around £281m, which includes construction of the buildings and public realm across the 150-hectare development, with individual contracts ranging from £5m to over £50m in value.

 

The first phase will see the creation of 530 new homes for university staff, over 300 student bed spaces and a local centre with a supermarket, unit shops, doctors’ surgery and other community buildings.

 

North West Cambridge Development construction director, Gavin Heaphy, said: “The university’s investment in infrastructure reflects the deep commitment to creating a high quality urban development that will benefit not only the future residents, but also neighbouring communities. 

 

“The complex logistics behind the infrastructure, coupled with the ambitious levels of sustainability, make this a great opportunity for Skanska to join the team and work with us to create a lasting legacy for the university and the wider area.”

 

Photo: Cambridge University Reporter

 

Sources:

www.constructionenquirer.com

www.constructionnews.co.uk

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